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Ultimate Namibia: Windhoek to Windhoek

Duration
10 Days
Prices From:
US$ 3,500

This Ultimate Namibia safari affords you the chance to experience this magnificent country in a very personal way. You will have your own professional and experienced safari guide who will enhance your enjoyment of this unique country by ensuring a stress-free journey of discovery amid dramatic, ever-changing scenery.


This 10-day trip through Namibia uncovers one of Africa’s most awe-inspiring, yet enigmatic countries. Giant dunes, skeletal ghost towns, a native culture dating back thousands of years, and wildlife unlike anywhere else on the continent all form part of Namibia’s compelling puzzle.

Set out from Windhoek in your private safari vehicle, bound for the Sossus Dune Lodge in the most scenic part of the Namib Desert. Built with conservation in mind, the lodge is the ideal place to refresh from your flight, or if you have the energy, the ideal jumping off point for a visit to Sesriem Canyon, or Elm Dune. Be sure to get some rest for the following day, when you visit Sossusvlei and Deadvlei, the otherworldly desert park where ghostly Acacia trees rise from the long dried marsh, all in the shadow of towering orange dunes. You can also pre-book (at extra cost) a hot air balloon flight for the early morning before you depart.

If Swakopmund seems like a small German beach resort, it’s with good reason. Namibia was once a German colony, and the architecture here preserves some of that past. As a result, it’s one of the most interesting seaside resorts you’ll ever visit. Swakopmund is as much a playground for nature lovers as it is history buffs. Journey out to Walvis Bay for kayaking in the outer lagoon. See fur seals, dolphins, flamingos, pelicans, and other wildlife that thrive in this largely unspoiled habitat.

Head into the mountainous region known as Damaraland, famous for its rock formations and pre-historic rock engravings. Hunter gatherers inhabited this land for thousands of years, leaving another fascinating piece of Namibia’s puzzle to explore. This is also another rich wildlife region. Keep your eyes peeled for elephants, rare black rhinos, and giraffes, all of whom call this desert landscape home. Adapted to this environment, some of Namibia’s animals differ to their counterparts in neighbouring South Africa or Botswana.

You’ll really start to notice this in Etosha National Park, probably Namibia’s most famous wildlife park. It’s also home to the native Himba people, and you’ll visit a local Himba settlement as part of your visit. After that, it’s time for game viewing in Etosha! There’s no telling exactly which animals you’ll see on any given day, but elephants, lions, giraffes, wildebeest, eland, kutu, zebra, oryx, rhinos, the world’s densest concentration of cheetahs…the list goes on. With so much to potentially see, you’ll have two days of game viewing here, staying at the beautiful Onguma Treetop Camp.

Your last day in Namibia takes you to the AfriCat Day Centre, which conducts valuable research and rehabilitation of injured or captured big cats including leopards and cheetahs. You’ll arrive back in Windhoek by late afternoon in time for a night flight, or stay an extra night if you’d rather not rush.


 

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Duration
10 Days
Prices From:
US$ 3,500

Itinerary View Trip Map

Day 1

Windhoek to Sossusvlei Area

This morning a Goway representative will collect you from your various accommodation establishments or from the Windhoek International Airport (assuming you land before 8:00am). You then depart Windhoek in your safari vehicle with your private guide and drive southwest through the scenic Khomas Hochland highlands before heading down the Great Escarpment into the Namib Desert below, stopping for a picnic lunch at a scenic location along the way. You arrive at Sossus Dune Lodge in the mid-afternoon and you will stay here for two nights whilst you explore the remarkable sights of the Namib Desert with your guide. If there is still time today, your guide will take you to visit Sesriem Canyon, a nearby geological attraction, or explore Elim Dune. However, if you prefer, you can just relax and soak in the scenic and tranquil surroundings at Sossus Dune Lodge.

Sesriem Canyon: Sesriem Canyon has evolved through centuries of erosion by the Tsauchab River which has incised a narrow gorge about 1.5 km long and 30 meters deep into the surrounding conglomerates, exposing the varying layers of sedimentation deposited over millions of years. The shaded cool depths of the canyon allow pools of water to gather during the rainy season and remain for much of the year round. These pools were a vital source of water for early settlers who drew water for their livestock by knotting six (ses) lengths of rawhide thongs (riems) together, hence the canyon and surrounding area became known as Sesriem.

Sossus Dune Lodge: Sossus Dune Lodge is built in an environmentally sensitive manner, primarily from wood, canvas and thatch, in an attractive 'afro--village' style. Situated within the Namib Naukluft Park, close to the Sesriem Canyon, and providing sweeping vistas of the dunes to the west, guests benefit from being able to reach Sossusvlei before sunrise, or to stay until after sunset. Accommodation units are interlinked by elevated wooden walkways, and consist of 23 well spaced en suite desert chalets, equipped with tea stations and small fridges, with an additional relaxation gazebo. All units offer magnificent open vistas of the surrounding landscapes. Sossus Dune Lodge offers a good base from which to go on guided excursions to Sossusvlei, Sesriem and the surrounding areas, as well as sunset drives and guided walks, to fully unleash the beauty and biological diversity of the desert environment.

Meal Plan Lunch and Dinner
Duration2 Nights
Accommodation

Sossus Dune Lodge

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    Sossus Dune Lodge



    Built in an environmentally sensitive manner, primarily from wood, canvas and thatch, in an attractive 'afro-village' style, Sossus Dune Lodge will offer guests an evocative and life changing experience. Situated within the park, guests benefit from being able to reach Sossusvlei before sunrise, and to ...

    Built in an environmentally sensitive manner, primarily from wood, canvas and thatch, in an attractive 'afro-village' style, Sossus Dune Lodge will offer guests an evocative and life changing experience. Situated within the park, guests benefit from being able to reach Sossusvlei before sunrise, and to stay until after sunset, and on their return after an exhilarating day, to relax in the tranquility and splendour of the Namib Desert, under the spectacular African sky.

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Day 2

Sossusvlei / Namib Desert

This morning you will need to rise early for a magical excursion with your guide in the Namib Naukluft National Park, normally setting off before sunrise to capture the dunes whilst the light is soft and shadows accentuate the towering shapes and curves. This area boasts some of the highest free-standing sand dunes in the world and your guide will give you an insight on the formation of the Namib Desert and its myriad of fascinating creatures and plants that have adapted to survive these harsh environs. Once you have explored Sossusvlei, Deadvlei and surrounding dune fields to your heart's content you can enjoy a relaxed picnic brunch in the shade of a camel thorn tree. You then return to Sossus Dune Lodge in the early afternoon in time for a late lunch, with the option to visit Sesriem Canyon afterwards if you haven't already done so the day before. The rest of the afternoon is at your leisure (from experience, this is usually welcomed after an exhilarating morning in the dunes).

Sossusvlei: This most frequently visited section of the massive 50,000 square km Namib Naukluft National Park has become known as Sossusvlei, famous for its towering apricot coloured sand dunes which can be reached by following the Tsauchab River valley. Sossusvlei itself is actually a clay pan set amidst these star shaped dunes which stand up to 300 meters above the surrounding plains, ranking them among the tallest dunes on earth. The deathly white clay pan contrasts against the orange sands and forms the endpoint of the ephemeral Tsauchab River, within the interior of the Great Sand Sea. The river course rises south of the Naukluft Mountains in the Great Escarpment. It penetrates the sand sea for some 55 km before it finally peters out at Sossusvlei, about the same distance from the Atlantic Ocean. Until the encroaching dunes blocked its course around 60,000 years ago, the Tsauchab River once reached the sea; as ephemeral rivers still do in the northern half of the Namib. Sand-locked pans to the west show where the river previously flowed to before dunes shifted its endpoint to where it currently gathers at Sossusvlei.

Roughly once a decade rainfall over the catchment area is sufficient to bring the river down in flood and fill the pan. On such occasions the mirror images of dunes and camel thorn trees around the pan are reflected in the water. Sossusvlei is the biggest of four pans in the vicinity. Another, famous for its gnarled and ghostly camel thorn trees, is Deadvlei which can be reached on foot over 1 km of sand. Deadvlei's striking camel thorn trees, dead for want of water, still stand erect as they once grew. They survived until about 900 years ago when the sand sea finally blocked the river from occasionally flooding the pan.

Meal Plan Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Day 3

Sossusvlei to Swakopmund

NOTE: Option to include a sunrise balloon flight or scenic light aircraft flight over the Namib Naukluft National Park before you depart for Swakopmund (optional extra at additional cost). Please note that if making use of this offer, it will need to be booked exclusively with Goway in order to fit in with other timings for this day.

The fascinating drive today takes you northwest through awesome and ever changing desert landscapes of the Namib Naukluft National Park, including the impressive Gaub and Kuiseb canyons. You will meet the coast at the port town of Walvis Bay and then continue north to Swakopmund where you can enjoy the pleasant seaside location and cooler coastal air for your next two nights. There will be time this afternoon to explore the town and wander along the waterfront on foot, before heading off for dinner at a popular restaurant which specializes in fresh seafood.

NOTE: As an alternative to the drive from Sossus Dune Lodge to Swakopmund you may like to take a scenic light aircraft flight over Sossusvlei and along the Diamond Coast (optional extra at additional cost), allowing you a bird's eye view over the dune sea, abandoned mining camps, shipwrecks, Sandwich Harbour and salt pans before you land at Swakopmund Airport. Your guide will drive to meet up with you in Swakopmund later in the day. Please note that if making use of this offer, flights will need to be booked exclusively with Goway for absolute logistical reasons.

Swakopmund: Swakopmund resembles a small, German coastal resort nestled between the desert and the sea. It boasts a charming combination of German colonial architecture blended with modern hotels, shops, restaurants, museums, craft centres, galleries and caf├ęs. Swakopmund had its beginnings as a landing station in 1892 when the German Imperial Navy erected beacons on the site. Settlers followed and made attempts to create a harbour town by constructing a concrete Mole and then an iron jetty - which attempts were ultimately unsuccessful. The advent of World War one halted developments, and the town sank into decline until half a century later when infrastructure improved and an asphalt road opened between Windhoek and Swakopmund. This made reaching the previously isolated town quicker and easier and it prospered once again to become Namibia's premier resort town. Although the sea is normally cold for swimming there are pleasant beaches and the cooler climate is refreshing after time spent in the desert.

Centrally located guesthouse: A guesthouse located centrally in Swakopmund will be used for the next two nights in the town.

Meal Plan Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Duration2 Nights
Day 4

Swakopmund

After an early breakfast your guide will drive you along the scenic coastal road back south to Walvis Bay for a memorable kayaking adventure within the outer lagoon. After meeting your kayaking guide you will be taken on a short scenic drive to Pelican Point to see its lighthouse and windswept beauty, stopping briefly at the salt works to view the variety of birdlife on your way to the launch point. The kayaking is an ideal way of seeing Cape fur seals, Heaviside and bottlenose dolphins, pelicans, flamingos and a wide variety of other sea birds. If you are lucky, there is also a chance of seeing whales, leatherback turtles and sunfish. During the course of the day the guide will stop and inform you about the environment and light refreshments will be served on the beach before heading back to Walvis Bay.

You also have the choice to partake in a memorable motorized boat seal and dolphin excursion within the outer lagoon and harbour should the kayaking not appeal. Here you should also see Cape fur seals, heaviside and bottlenose dolphins, pelicans, flamingos and a wide variety of other sea birds. Again, if luck is on your side, there is also a chance of seeing whales, leatherback turtles and sunfish. During the course of the excursion snacks will be served along with local sparkling wine and fresh oysters, before you will return to the jetty at roughly midday.

You then have the opportunity to explore the waterfront area of Walvis Bay further before returning to Swakopmund for an afternoon at leisure at your guesthouse or out in town. Activities such as camel rides, scenic flights, sandboarding and more can all be booked at an extra cost.

Meal Plan Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Day 5

Swakopmund to Damaraland

Continuing on your safari today, the road takes you north and east into the wonderful and diverse region of Damaraland. You pass Namibia's highest mountain, the Brandberg which peaks at 2,573 m above sea level, and take time to view game and absorb the vastness of the scenery along the way. Damaraland is typified by displays of colour, magnificent table topped mountains, rock formations and bizarre-looking vegetation. The present day landscape has been formed by the erosion of wind, water and geological forces which have formed rolling hills, dunes, gravel plains and ancient river terraces. It is the variety and loneliness of the area as well as the scenic splendour which will reward and astound you, giving one an authentic understanding of the word 'wilderness'.

If time allows this afternoon your guide will take you to visit the nearby attractions and geological sites of the pre-historic Twyfelfontein rock engravings (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) - if not there is plenty of time to see them tomorrow.

Twyfelfontein: Strewn over a hillside amongst flat-topped mountains of red sandstone, Twyfelfontein's boulders and slabs of red sandstone hold some 2,500 prehistoric engravings that depict wildlife, animal spoor and abstract motifs. It is perhaps the largest and finest collection of petroglyphs in Africa. The engravings show animals such as elephant, giraffe, kudu, lion, rhinoceros, springbok, zebra and ostrich that once used to drink from a fountain at the bottom of the hill. In some cases footprints were engraved instead of hooves or paws. The abstract motifs feature mainly circles. Stone tools and other artifacts found at Twyfelfontein suggest that hunter-gatherers occupied the site over a period of perhaps 7,000 years. These days a local guide accompanies visitors to showcase the rock art. The engravings lie along two circular routes, one an hour's climb and the other 40 minutes longer. Twyfelfontein is one of Namibia's key National Monuments and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Camp Kipwe: Camp Kipwe lies in the heart of Damaraland, ideally located a short drive from the local attractions in the area. The Camp is nestled amongst an outcrop of giant granite boulders, a stone's throw away from the ephemeral Aba Huab riverbed where desert adapted elephants often traverse. Each comfortable thatched bungalow is simply but tastefully furnished with en-suite open-air bathroom. In the centre of the camp lies a large alfresco dining area, bar, lounge and reception with an inviting fireplace nearby to relax beside in the evenings. A refreshing swimming pool and sunset lookout with lovely views also complement the Camp.

Meal Plan Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Duration2 Days
Accommodation

Camp Kipwe

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    Camp Kipwe



    Huddled in the rocks, with sweeping views across the Aba Huab valley, Camp Kipwe is full of surprises, starting when guests first arrive. It appears as if rocks have tumbled down the hill to reveal this gem of a camp. The setting is one of ...

    Huddled in the rocks, with sweeping views across the Aba Huab valley, Camp Kipwe is full of surprises, starting when guests first arrive. It appears as if rocks have tumbled down the hill to reveal this gem of a camp. The setting is one of intimacy and space. An inviting lounge area, where birds fly in to enjoy the water seeping from the rocks, a refreshing swimming pool nestled in the rocks and a scattering of bungalows complete this eco friendly camp. The surrounding space and endless views of Damaraland cannot be contained. They beckon you to explore - enjoy an early morning game drive in search of elusive desert dwelling elephants, hike in the ancient surroundings of the Aba Huab River or travel back in time at Twyfelfontein, Namibia's first World Heritage Site.

    Facilities

    • Bungalows
    • Ensuite Bathrooms
    • Free Parking
    • Lounge
    • Swimming Pool

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Day 6

Damaraland

After an early breakfast you will be treated to an exciting 4x4 excursion along the ephemeral Aba Huab and Huab River valleys to explore this remarkable region and to search for game, including the elusive desert adapted elephants if they are in the area. Damaraland is home to a variety of desert adapted wildlife and hidden desert treasures. As the elephants are mostly active in the mornings you will normally have the best chance to see them then before returning to camp for lunch. However, if all the safari participants agree, you also have the option to take a picnic lunch and stop to enjoy that in the shade of a large Ana tree by the riverbed, ideally while watching a herd of elephant browsing nearby.

Your guide will arrange to fit in a visit to Twyfelfontein and other nearby attractions at a suitable time if you haven't already done so the previous day. On return to camp there should be time to take a walk into the local area with your guide if desired, or simply relax and enjoy some well-deserved leisure time.

Desert Adapted Elephant: In habitats with sufficient vegetation and water an adult elephant consumes as much as 300 kg of roughage and 230 litres of water every day of its life. Consider what a herd of them would eat and drink in a week or a month or a year. Finding an African elephant in a desert? Well, yes and not only elephant, but other large mammals as well, such as black rhinoceros and giraffe. Their ranges extend from river catchments in northern Kaokoveld as far south as the northern Namib. Apart from the Kunene River, seven river courses northwards from the Ugab provide them with possible routes across the desert, right to the Skeleton Coast. The biggest are the Hoarusib, the Hoanib, the Huab and the Ugab Rivers. Desert adapted elephant in Kaokoland and the Namib walk further for water and fodder than any other elephant in Africa. The distances between waterholes and feeding grounds can be as great as 68 km. The typical home range of a family herd is larger than 2,000 sq km, or eight times as big as ranges in central Africa where rainfall is much higher. They walk and feed at night and rest during the day. To meet their nutritional and bulk requirements they browse on no fewer than 74 of the 103 plant species that grow in their range. Not a separate species or even a subspecies, they are an ecotype unique to Namibia in Africa south of the equator, behaviourally adapted to hyper-arid conditions. Elephant in Mali on the southwestern fringe of the Sahara Desert are the only others known to survive in similar conditions.

Meal Plan Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Day 7

Damaraland to Southern Etosha National Park

Today after a very early breakfast you set off on your journey to the Etosha National Park, travelling via the scenic Grootberg Pass. Along the way your guide will take you to visit a local Himba settlement -- you may have to search for a while as the semi-nomadic Himba people sometimes move location with no notice. They are one of the last truly traditional peoples of Namibia and have little time for conventional practices. Here you will learn about the customs and traditions of this very proud nation, and will be given insight into their beliefs, way of life and everyday routine. Depending on the school semester and school holidays, you may also visit the Grootberg Primary School, a rural school where Ultimate Safaris' Conservation Travel Foundation is actively involved, assisting with improved education infrastructure and methods. After visiting the Himba and school you will head east through the small town of Kamanjab before heading on towards tonight's destination at the homey Andersson's Camp, which is situated just south of the Etosha National Park's Andersson Gate. A picnic lunch will be enjoyed en-route and arrival will be in the very late afternoon or early evening (after a long but rewarding day). After your arrival you will have some time at leisure, which can be spent appreciating the unique surroundings and enjoying the game viewing at the camp's floodlit waterhole and enjoy a different vantage point from the camps underground hide.

The Himba: The Himba, Tjimba and other Herero people who inhabit Namibia's remote north-western Kunene Region are loosely referred to as the Kaokovelders. Basically Herero in terms of origin, language and culture, they are semi-nomadic pastoralists who tend to tend from one watering place to another. They seldom leave their home areas and maintain, even in their own, on which other cultures have made little impression. For many centuries they have lived a relatively isolated existence and were not involved to any noteworthy extent in the long struggle for pasturelands between the Nama and the Herero. The largest group of Kaokovelders is the Himba, semi-nomads who live in scatteredsettlements throughout the Kunene Region. They are a tall, slender and statuesque people, characterized especially by their proud yet friendly bearing. The women especially are noted for their unusual sculptural beauty, enhanced by intricate hairstyles and traditional adornments.

They rub their bodies with red ochre and fat, a treatment that protects their skins against the harsh desert climate. The homes of the Himba of Kaokoland are simple, cone-shaped structures of saplings, bound together with palm leaves and plastered with mud and dung. The men build the structures, while the women mix the clay and do the plastering. A fire burns in the headman's hut day and night, to keep away insects and provide light and heating. A family may move from one home to another several times a year to seek grazing for their goats and cattle. A Himba woman spends as much as three hours a day on her toilette. First she bathes, then she anoints herself with her own individually prepared mixture which not only protects her skin from the harsh desert sun, but also keeps insects away and prevents her body hair from falling out. She uses another mixture of butter fat, fresh herbs and black coals to rub on her hair, and 'steams' her clothes regularly over the permanent fire. Men, women and children adorn themselves with necklaces, bracelets, anklets and belts made from iron and shell beads. With their unusual and striking designs, these items have gained a commercial value and are being produced on a small scale for the urban market. Sculptural headrests in particular are sought-after items.

Andersson's Camp: Located just 4.5 km from Etosha National Park's Andersson Gate, Andersson's Camp takes its name from Charles Andersson, the Swedish explorer who first 'discovered' the Etosha Pan with Sir Francis Galton in 1851. Set against a backdrop of the low Ondundozonanandana Mountains, Andersson's Camp is located within the private Ongava Game Reserve which borders onto Etosha National Park. The Ongava Game Reserve is typified by white calcrete soils, rocky outcrops and scrub-covered plains which support a rich variety of game such as giraffe, lion, rhino and various antelope species. The Camp overlooks a waterhole where guests can enjoy the interaction of wildlife coming and going throughout the day and night. This former farmstead has been tastefully rebuilt to modern-day standards and the design and construction was guided primarily by the principles of environmental sustainability -- reduce, reuse, recycle. The old farmhouse now forms the main dining, bar and swimming pool area, with guest tents radiating outwards into the secluded Mopane woodlands typical of the region. Tents are constructed using a clever mix of calcrete stone cladding, canvas and wood, with and a small verandah that is an extension of the elevated wooden decks on which the tents are raised. The en-suite bathrooms continue the unique design.

Meal Plan Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Duration1 Night
Accommodation

Andersson's Camp

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    Andersson's Camp



    Family-friendly Andersson's Camp, named for Charles Andersson, the Swedish explorer who first described the Etosha Pan, takes the past and moves it decidedly forward. Turning an old homestead into an acclaimed eco-camp, Andersson's offers cozy accommodation, a relaxing dining area, a swimming pool, and a ...

    Family-friendly Andersson's Camp, named for Charles Andersson, the Swedish explorer who first described the Etosha Pan, takes the past and moves it decidedly forward.
    Turning an old homestead into an acclaimed eco-camp, Andersson's offers cozy accommodation, a relaxing dining area, a swimming pool, and a waterhole with a water level photographic hide to complete the camp where guests feel truly at home in the bush.

    Facilities

    • Swimming Pool
    • Swimming Pool

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Day 8

Southern to Eastern Etosha National Park

Today is dedicated to a full day of exciting game viewing within the central section of Etosha National Park from your private safari vehicle as you make your way from the southern Andersson's Gate to Halali (where you may stop for lunch) and then on across via selected waterholes such as Goas, which are normally particularly good for game viewing, to Namutoni Camp in the east. You will have to leave the Park before sunset and head out to stay at the delightful Onguma Tree Top Camp with enough time to relax and freshen up before for dinner. The rest of the evening can be spent game viewing at the camp's floodlit waterhole where game comes and goes throughout the day and night.

Etosha National Park: Etosha National Park covers 22,270 sq km, of which approximately 5,000 sq km is made up of saline depressions or 'pans'. The largest of these pans, the Etosha Pan, can be classified as a saline desert in its own right. The Etosha Pan lies in the Owambo Basin, on the north-western edge of the Namibian Kalahari Desert. Until three million years ago it formed part of huge, shallow lake that was reduced to a complex of salt pans when the major river that fed it, the Kunene, changed course and began to flow to the Atlantic instead. If the lake existed today, it would be the third largest in the world. Etosha is the largest of the pans at 4,760 k sq km in extent. It is nowadays filled with water only when sufficient rain falls to the north in Angola, inducing floods to flow southward along the Cuvelai drainage system. The Park consists of grassland, woodland and savannah. Game-viewing centers around the numerous springs and waterholes where several different species can often be seen at one time. The Park boasts some 114 mammal and over 340 bird species. Wildlife that one might see includes elephant, lion, giraffe, blue wildebeest, eland, kudu, gemsbok (oryx), zebra, rhino, cheetah, leopard, hyena, honey badger and warthog, as well as the endemic black faced impala.

Onguma Tree Top Camp: Tree Top is a unique and beautiful camp, situated on the private Onguma Game Reserve, bordering on the eastern side of Etosha National Park. It is a small and intimate camp, especially designed for those travellers who would like to truly experience the bush in all its raw splendour. This camp is built on wooden stilts amongst the tree tops with full views over one of the most beautiful watering holes on the Reserve. The camp consists of 4 thatched wooden chalets and a main complex, making the camp ideal for a small group looking for a private getaway. The main complex is completely open towards the front where the waterhole is situated, but there is also the option of letting down canvas sides if the weather is inclement. Guests can relax in the comfortable lounge or in front of the fire place. The kitchen is open plan so guests can watch whilst the chef conjures up wonderful dishes on an open fire. The Boma area steps off from the lounge deck, where guests can relax while watching the animals and birds that frequent the hole throughout the day. The thatched rooms are designed in such a way that the canvas sides can be opened to expose breath-taking view and animals at any time. All rooms have an en-suite bathroom as well as a wonderful private outside shower, and a private deck in front where guests can relax and enjoy exactly the same views as from the main area's deck.

Meal Plan Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Duration2 Nights
Accommodation

Onguma Treetop Camp

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    Onguma Treetop Camp



    Onguma Tree Top Camp is a small and intimate camp, especially designed for those travellers who would like to truly experience the bush in all its raw splendour. This is where guests are able to come and relax for a few days in the midst ...

    Onguma Tree Top Camp is a small and intimate camp, especially designed for those travellers who would like to truly experience the bush in all its raw splendour.

    This is where guests are able to come and relax for a few days in the midst of their busy travelling schedule, and just breathe in the aromas of the bush and take in all the wildness that this place has to offer.

    The Camp is built on wooden stilts amongst the tree tops with full views over one of the most beautiful watering holes on Onguma Game Reserve. The Camp consists of 4 thatched rooms with canvas walls, outside showers, a dining room and a main complex.

    Onguma Tree Top Camp is a place to savour, small bits at a time. A place where giraffe, zebra, lion, and many other species of antelope come to quench their thirst. A place where birds and animals become your daily companion. Onguma - a place you will not want to forget.

    Facilities

    • Bar
    • Free Parking
    • Free WiFi
    • Hairdryers
    • Outdoor Shower

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Day 9

Etosha National Park / Onguma Game Reserve

Another morning dedicated to memorable game drives within the eastern section of Etosha National Park with your guide. You return to camp for lunch and an early afternoon rest, spending your final afternoon on a game drive on the private Onguma Game Reserve, culminating in a sundowner overlooking Fischer's Pan. You then return after sunset with enough time to freshen up and enjoy your final 'safari dinner' overlooking the camp's floodlit waterhole.

Onguma Game Reserve: Situated on the eastern side of Etosha National Park and bordering Fisher's Pan, Onguma Game Reserve has more than 20,000 hectare of protected land and wildlife. The nature reserve boasts over thirty different animal species consisting of plains game such as kudu, giraffe, eland, oryx, hartebeest, zebra, impala and many more roam freely, as well as predators such as lion, cheetah and leopard, being common residents of the area. Onguma Game Reserve is now proud to be home to a family of black rhinos! More than 300 bird species can also be viewed at Onguma Game Reserve.

Meal Plan Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Day 10

Onguma Game Reserve to Windhoek via the AfriCat Foundation

Your early departure will take you south from Onguma Tree Top via Tsumeb, Otavi and Otjiwarongo to reach Okonjima's AfriCat Day Centre, a wonderful highlight with which to conclude your safari. Okonjima is home to the AfriCat Foundation, a wildlife sanctuary which focuses on the research and rehabilitation of Africa's big cats, especially injured or captured leopard and cheetah. You arrive in time for lunch before embarking on an exciting and informative game drive and tour of the centre. Here you will learn about the function and vision of the AfriCat Foundation and will also get to meet some of the Foundation's special carnivore ambassadors. After the excursion and freshening up, the journey continues further south to arrive back in Windhoek in the late afternoon, just as the sun is setting. Upon your arrival in Windhoek you will be transferred to your accommodation establishment of choice, or out to the Windhoek International Airport (transfer to be booked additionally) if flying out in the evening - departure flights must be no earlier than 9:00pm to allow sufficient time for the visit to the AfriCat Foundation and the journey back to Windhoek, or a final night in Windhoek can be arranged at additional cost if required. A final night in Windhoek is highly recommended!

Meal Plan Breakfast

Other Information

DEPARTURES:

Tuesdays

PRICE INCLUDES:

  • Accommodation as indicated
  • Transportation in a luxury air-conditioned safari vehicle
  • All meals as mentioned
  • Services of a registered and experienced naturalist English-speaking safari guide
  • Entrance fees and excursions as described in itinerary
  • Mineral water on board the safari vehicle
  • Welcome pack

PRICE EXCLUDES:

  • International flights to Namibia and airport taxes
  • Return airport transfers from Windhoek International Airport - Windhoek - Windhoek International Airport
  • Pre and post safari accommodation in Windhoek
  • Any entrance fees and excursions not included in itinerary
  • All beverages with the exception of mineral water on board the safari vehicle
  • Laundry (laundry service available at lodges at extra cost)
  • Gratuities
  • Items of personal nature (telephone expenses, curios, medicines etc)
  • Travel insurance
  • Visas if required

TERMS AND CONDITIONS:

Prices are "from" per person based on twin/double share accommodation and for travel in low season. Seasonal surcharges and blackout dates may apply. Limited seat/spaces and all pricing is subject to change and availability. Rates for single or triple travellers are available on request - please inquire.

TB ULTIMATWIN18SA: UN
29 May 2018
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