Specials Trip Finder Brochures Menu

Jaguars Otters & Jungles

Duration
9 Days
Prices From:
US$ 4,348

Fancy leaving your friends both jealous and scrambling for the world map? Guyana boasts vast, unspoiled rainforests, healthy populations of jaguar, tapir and caiman, plus an English-speaking indigenous population.


This 9-day round trip from Georgetown takes you to see the exotic wildlife, natural beauty and authentic indigenous culture of one of Latin America’s least-explored countries.

Departing the capital, your journey begins at Kaieteur Falls. Five times the height of Niagara, they are named for a chief of the Patamona tribe, who is said to have sacrificed himself to the spirit Makonaima by canoeing over the falls to protect his tribe from destruction. Several rare birds and animals also congregate around this impressive wall of water. Nearby Orinduik Falls is another natural highlight. Cascading over solid jasper terraces, it offers numerous spots suitable for swimming.

Fly over the rainforest to Annai, home to the Macushi tribe, who still practice many of their forebear’s traditions today. Try your hand at making some local handicrafts, take a tour of the village, and through the forest to see the wildlife after dark. You’ll enjoy a morning climb of Surama Mountain, having breakfast at the summit. Then journey to the Burro Burro River, where Giant River Otters, Tapir, and Spider Monkeys await.

Follow the Cock-of-the-rock Trail for a chance to see this elusive bird, and perhaps even a Jaguar (your chances here are comparatively good, owing to a healthy, largely undisturbed population of the big cats). Transfer to Iwokrama River Lodge. Dedicated to the study of sustainable uses for the forest, Iwokrama is owned by local people and through combining the talents of specialists and communities, has made great strides in conservation. You’ll have plenty of time to explore the nearby trails with a Ranger guide, and enjoy a nocturnal river cruise to seek out caiman.

More incredible views greet you at the top of Turtle Mountain before your journey to Kurupukari Falls. Visit a small Amerindian village where you can try cassava and visit a Butterfly Farm. Your journey ends back in Georgetown, where an afternoon city tour takes you through the unique colonial architecture of the city, as well as to the Botanical Gardens and Stabroek Market.


 

Read More

At Goway we are experts at designing personalized itineraries to suit your special interests, tastes and budget. Let us arrange your ultimate travel experience today.
Duration
9 Days
Prices From:
US$ 4,348

Itinerary View Trip Map

Day 1

Arrive Georgetown

On arrival into Guyana you will be met and transferred to your hotel in Georgetown. The remainder of the day is at leisure.

Duration2 Nights
Accommodation

Cara Lodge

More Info

  • starstarstar

    Cara Lodge


    Cara Lodge is the perfect hotel for those who want to soak up Guyanese heritage and culture. One of the oldest wooden buildings in Georgetown, it has in just a few years become the best known hotel in the country. Cara Lodge was built in ...

    Cara Lodge is the perfect hotel for those who want to soak up Guyanese heritage and culture. One of the oldest wooden buildings in Georgetown, it has in just a few years become the best known hotel in the country.

    Cara Lodge was built in the 1840s and originally consisted of two houses. It has a long and romantic history associated with it and was the home of the first Lord Mayor of Georgetown. Over the years it has hosted many dignitaries including Edward VII who stayed at the house in 1923 and planted the sapodilla tree in the front garden to mark the occasion. Other dignitaries have included President Jimmy Carter in 1996 and HRH Prince Charles in April 2000, HRH Prince Andrew in 2004 and Mick Jagger in 2005.

    All the rooms reflect the traditional building style of Guyana and all rooms have traditional Demerara Shutters and polished wooden floors.

    More Details

Day 2

Georgetown Botanical Gardens and Kaieteur Falls

An early pick up for your trip to the extensive and beautiful Georgetown Botanical Gardens where, if you are lucky, we will have more views of the Blood-colored Woodpecker. This astonishingly colorful Veniliornis is found only in the Guianas and even there almost wholly limited to the narrow coastal plain. The gardens host Snail Kite, Gray Hawk, Pearl Kite, Carib Grackle, Red-bellied Macaw, and Red-shouldered. You will walk on trails in the back of the gardens and may see Yellow-chinned Spinetail, Black-crested Antshrike, Silver-beaked Tanager, Buff-breasted Wren, Golden-spangled Piculet and Ashy-headed Greenlet. You may even want to take a break from birding to feed some manatees in one of the nearby ponds.

From the Eugene F. Correia International Airport take a scheduled flight over the Demerara and Essequibo Rivers and hundreds of miles of unbroken tropical rainforest to land at Kaieteur Falls, the world's highest free-falling waterfall.

The Kaieteur Falls which was first seen by a European on April 29, 1870 is situated in the heart of Guyana on the Potaro River, a tributary of the Essequibo. The water of Kaieteur, one of the world's natural wonders, flows over a sandstone conglomerate tableland into a deep gorge - a drop of 822 feet or 5 times the height of Niagara Falls.

There are no other falls in the world with the magnitude of the sheer drop existing at Kaieteur. Amerindian legend of the Patamona tribe has it that Kai, one of the tribe's chiefs (after who the falls is named), committed self sacrifice by canoeing himself over the falls. It was believed this would encourage the great spirit Makonaima to save the tribe from being destroyed by the savage Caribishi.

Kaieteur supports a unique micro environment with Tank Bromeliads, the largest in the world, in which the tiny Golden frog spends its entire life. The rarely seen Guianan Cock-of-the-rock nests close by. The lucky visitor may also see the famous flights of the Kaieteur Swifts or Makonaima Birds which nest under the vast shelf of rock carved by the centuries of water, hidden behind the eternal curtain of falling water.

Because of its remote location, most visitors to the falls won't see any other people during their stay. Return to Gerogetown.

Flights to Kaieteur Falls are operated on chartered aircraft and all flights have a minimum passenger restriction. Therefore, any booking to Kaieteur and Orinduik Falls is subject to a minimum of 12 passengers being available to travel. In most cases we are able to fill flights, especially if scheduled for a weekend. However, in the rare case that we cannot meet the required numbers we will reschedule the trip to another day during your stay, if this is possible.

After dinner, depart for a night tour/night crawl around the city of Georgetown. You will visit popular night spots including street food stands, popular bars and even the Bourda night market where the fruits are always fresh and the coconut water always cold.

Meal Plan Breakfast
Day 3

Iwokrama Rainforest

After breakfast, board schedule flight for journey over hundreds of miles of tropical rainforest to land at Fair View Airstrip.

The Iwokrama Rainforest is a vast wilderness of one million acres. This protected area was established in 1996 as the Iwokrama International Centre for Rainforest Conservation and Development. The Iwokrama Forest is in the heart of one of four last untouched tropical forests of the world - The Guiana Shield of North-Eastern South America. Iwokrama was established as a living laboratory for tropical forest management. The unsustainable utilisation of these forests will result in the extinction of half the world's plant and animal species and bring unknown changes to global climate.

This is a protected area with a difference - the full involvement of people. Iwokrama is exceptional among conservation organizations because it joins with local people in every aspect of its work. From research to business, Iwokrama ensures local economic and social benefits from forest use and conservation. The Forest is in the homeland of the Makushi people, who have lived here and used the forest for thousands of years. People are a vital part of the ecosystem. The success of Iwokrama relies on the ownership of local people and the combined skills of specialists and communities. Iwokrama does what so many International conventions have acknowledged as best practice. It has begun conservation locally and integrated conservation into national development.

The Iwokrama River Lodge is set overlooking the Essequibo River. Accommodation is offered in eight spacious timber cabins with shingle roofs, bathroom facilities and veranda overlooking the river. Running water and flush toilets are standard, however water is not heated (and rarely desired in the tropical heat).

Electricity is provided by a combination of solar and diesel generator systems, and wireless internet access is provided for free in the main building. Meals are served buffet-style in the Fred Allicock dining hall, where you can mingle with the rangers, administrative and scientific staff.

Explore the trails around the lodge with an Iwokrama Ranger. Iwokrama is home to many bird species including Capuchin bird, Black Nunbird, Chestnut-rumped Woodcreeper, Amazonian Antshrike, Brown-bellied Antwren, Spot-tailed Antwren, Todd's Antwren, Spotted Puffbird, Green Aracari, Guianan Toucanet, Guianan Red Cotinga, Pompadour Cotinga, Rufous-crowned Elaenia, Bronzy Jacamar, Chestnut & Waved Woodpecker, Gray Antbird, and Strong-billed Woodcreeper. Three other Neotropical species in the Iwokrama forest of high interest are White-winged Potoo, Rufous Potoo, and Rufous-winged Ground-cuckoo.

The forest is also home to many mammals and you may see Red-rumped Agouti and various species of monkey including Red Howler, Black Spider and Wedge-capped and Brown Capuchins.

After dark we'll set out on the river, in hope of finding one or another of its four species of caiman, and listen for night birds such as Spectacled Owl, White-winged Potoo, Rufous Potoo, Long-tailed Potoo, Zigzag Heron or Blackish Nightjar. Using our flashlights, we will look for the eyeshine of snakes including Cox boa, tree frogs and if lucky maybe some mammals.

Meal Plan Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Duration2 Nights
Accommodation

Iwokrama River Lodge

More Info

Location View map
  • starstarstar

    Iwokrama River Lodge



    Nestled on the banks of the majestic Essequibo River in the heart of Guyana is the award-winning Iwokrama River Lodge and Research Centre. This eco-tourism gem is surrounded by a vast tropical rain forest which was donated to the international community in 1989 to demonstrate ...

    Nestled on the banks of the majestic Essequibo River in the heart of Guyana is the award-winning Iwokrama River Lodge and Research Centre. This eco-tourism gem is surrounded by a vast tropical rain forest which was donated to the international community in 1989 to demonstrate Guyana's commitment to combating climate change and to show how tropical forests could be used to provide sustainable economic benefits. The Lodge consists of guest accommodation, a full service kitchen, restaurant, bar, two shops, and a boat dock.

    Facilities

    • Bar
    • Bird Watching
    • Canoe

    More Details

Day 4

Iwokrama Rainforest

Making an early start, you will embark on the Essequibo and circumnavigate nearby Indian House Island, before returning to the River Lodge for breakfast.

Leave the lodge by boat, birdwatching along the way, for the hike to Turtle Mountain. A well-maintained trail winds through the forest before an exhilarating climb up the mountain to its summit at 935ft (approx. 360m). It takes 1 3/4hrs to walk up the mountain, but the effort is more than worth it for the breathtaking views over the forest canopy when you get there and chances of Green Aracari, White Bellbird or a fly-by of one of five types of eagles. This trail is also a great location for seeing Black Spider Monkey and Red Howler Monkey. This pristine forest offers huge buttress trees and the endemic Greenheart, a highly sought after hardwood. If you think this hike may be too strenuous you can take an alternative boat trip to Stanley Lake to search for Giant River Otters and Black Caiman.

As the afternoon cools you set out on a boat trip to visit Kurupukari Falls to see the Amerindian petroglyphs (dependent on the water level).

Late this afternoon take drive through the forest in an area known for Jaguar sightings. This elusive cat is on the top of everyone's wildlife list and whilst not guaranteed there is a reasonable chance you could be fortunate and have a sighting. Apart from Jaguar there are other wildlife opportunities along this corridor.

Meal Plan Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Day 5

Iwokrama Rainforest and Jaguar Spotting

Transfer by 4 x 4 along the trail that is one of the best places to see the elusive Jaguar. The Iwokrama forest is rapidly gaining an international reputation for its healthy jaguar populations that seem not to be troubled by the appearance of curious humans. No promises, but many have been lucky! Along the road, we will watch for the myriad of bird species that frequent the forest edge, including Crimson and Purple-necked Fruit-crow, Crimson Topaz, Green Oropendula, Spotted and Guianan Puffbird, Scarlet and Red-and-Green Macaw, Blue-cheeked and Orange-winged Parrot and Gray-winged Trumpeter. This road is the only north -- south access in Guyana and links the country to Brazil. Even so traffic is only very occasional, and wildlife is often seen along the road, such as Agouti, Tayra, Puma, Tapir and Black Curassow. The journey concludes at the Atta Rainforest Lodge.

The Iwokrama Canopy Walkway is situated near the southern boundary of the Iwokrama Reserve in central Guyana. The walkway has four suspension bridges leading to three platforms, the highest of which is over 30 metres above the ground, and these will allow great looks at a range of canopy species, many of which you would struggle to see well from the forest floor.

Another area where we will want to spend some time is the clearing around the lodge, as this is one of the best places to see another of Guyana's "must see" birds, the Crimson Fruitcrow. This species is seen here on a reasonably regular basis, as it often comes to feed in some of the nearby trees. The clearing is also a reliable site for Black Curassow as there is a family party which has become habituated to people and regularly passes through the clearing.

Atta Rainforest Lodge is 500 metres from the base of the Canopy Walkway, offering comfortable private-room accommodation with ensuite bathrooms, delicious home-cooked meals, and traditional Amerindian hospitality. The lodge is completely surrounded by tropical rainforest which offers a complete immersion in the rainforest experience. The main building is open sided with views across the gardens to the towering forest on all sides and houses the bar, dining area and kitchen.

Meal Plan Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Duration1 Night
Accommodation

Iwokrama Atta Rainforest Camp

More Info

  • starstarstar

    Iwokrama Atta Rainforest Camp


    At the base of the canopy walkway is Atta Rainforest Lodge, resting amidst towering trees and grassy lawns. The forest around the walkway contains some important flora and fauna. Among these are endangered and protected species such as the jaguar, the bullet wood tree, greenheart ...

    At the base of the canopy walkway is Atta Rainforest Lodge, resting amidst towering trees and grassy lawns. The forest around the walkway contains some important flora and fauna. Among these are endangered and protected species such as the jaguar, the bullet wood tree, greenheart and the waramadan (endemic in Guyana only to the Iwokrama Forest). The lodge provides comfortable accommodation with 8 private rooms, three home-cooked meals per day, and ample opportunities to explore the surrounding rainforest by foot, canoe, or 4X4.

    More Details

Day 6

Surama

Before dawn return to the canopy where you will welcome the dawn chorus. From this tree top vantage, you can sometimes see Red Howler Monkeys and Black Spider Monkeys.

Apart from the Iwokrama Canopy Walkway itself you can enjoy wildlife and birdwatching walks on the trails around the area. For those interested in botany many of the trails have the key tree species marked. Many bird species, stunning insects, noisy amphibians, and playful primates make the surrounding forest their home. Deer, Tapir and agouti are also regular visitors to the lodge.

Return to the lodge for breakfast before departure.

Transfer from Atta Rainforest Lodge by vehicle through the rainforest to Corkwood in the Iwokrama Forest. Here there is a comparatively short trail to hopefully see the amazingly brilliant Guianan Cock-of-the-rock. This trail is through interesting and pristine rainforest and the guides can explain how the plants are used for medicine and other purposes. Continue the journey to the community of Surama.

The Amerindian community of Surama is located in the heart of Guyana. The village is set in five square miles of savannah which is ringed by the forest covered Pakaraima Mountains. Surama's inhabitants are mainly from the Macushi tribe and still observe many of the traditional practises of their ancestors.

This isolated and idyllic location offers an escape from the concrete jungle to a serene and peaceful existence with nature. The guides have lived their entire lives in the rainforest and have an incredible understanding of nature and how to utilise its resources.

On arrival in Surama you will receive a warm welcome from local staff and settle into your accommodation at the Surama Eco-lodge. A local guide will escort you for a short walk on trails to observe the forest and bird life. As the afternoon cools your guide will take you on a tour of the village. Visit the local school, medical centre and church along with some of the village houses. Tonight, enjoy an educational walk to observe wildlife and experience the mystique of the forest after dark. Make sure to bring your flashlights to look for the eyeshine of the creatures of the night.

Meal Plan Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Duration2 Nights
Accommodation

Surama Eco Lodge

More Info

  • starstarstar

    Surama Eco Lodge


    The Eco Lodge at Surama is the visitor's gateway to the idyllic Pakaraima Mountains and Burro Burro River bordering the village. This part of Guyana features some of the most impressive examples of thriving rainforest ecology to be found anywhere on earth. The abundant flora ...

    The Eco Lodge at Surama is the visitor's gateway to the idyllic Pakaraima Mountains and Burro Burro River bordering the village. This part of Guyana features some of the most impressive examples of thriving rainforest ecology to be found anywhere on earth. The abundant flora and fauna is masterfully curated by local residents who convey a compellingly intimate fluency with nature through hikes, river canoe expeditions, and visits to community schools, centers, and traditional events.

    The lodge is operated cooperatively by villagers who take time out of their normal daily routines to provide services to guests. You will be treated to authentic Makushi hospitality, as if you were a guest in one of their homes. Lodging is provided in one of four traditional 'benab' buildings or the new cabin-lodge. All have attached bathrooms with running (cold) water and flush toilets. The buildings are simple, comfortable, and clean. Home cooked meals are served in the central benab.

    More Details

Day 7

Pakaraima Mountains

Rise before dawn for a walk across the savannah and then climb up Surama Mountain for incredible views across the village and savannah to the Pakaraima Mountains. This is not a technical climb but can be arduous, especially after rain, and not for everyone. Your guides will happily offer alternative activities if you prefer not to do this climb.

Return to the lodge for lunch and then take a three mile walk across the savannah and through the rainforest to the Burro Burro River. Your guides will then paddle you on the Burro Burro River for opportunities to observe Giant River Otters, Tapir, Tayra, Spider Monkeys and many more species. Return to the lodge for sunset.

Meal Plan Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Day 8

Georgetown

Enjoy dawn breaking across the rainforest. You can choose from a forest walk to look for wildlife and birds or relax around the lodge before breakfast and departure.

Georgetown the chief port, capital and largest city of Guyana is situated on the right bank of the Demerara River Estuary. It was chosen as a site for a fort to guard the early Dutch settlements of the Demerara River. The city of Georgetown was designed largely by the Dutch and is laid out in a rectangular pattern with wide tree lined avenues and irrigation canals that crisscross the city. Your Guide will explain the unique geography of Georgetown. Being six feet below sea level Georgetown depends on the canals and Kokers for its survival.

Many of the buildings in the city are wooden with unique architecture dating back to the 18th and 19th centuries. For the most part the buildings have Demerara shutters and designed fretwork with trimmed eaves and windows. Main Street, Georgetown provides several excellent examples of old colonial homes. Prime examples being both the Prime Minister's residence and the State House, built in 1852.

During your visit to Georgetown there are a number of interesting sights that should not be missed: the most famous being St. George's Cathedral. The Cathedral is one of the world's tallest free standing wooden buildings and was consecrated on 1892. The building was designed by Sir Arthur Bloomfield. The story of the cathedral is told on the interior on tablets and memorials of a historical and sentimental nature: it is the tale of the history of Guyana in general and of the Diocese in particular.

At the beginning of the Avenue of the Republic stands the Public Library housed in the Carnegie Building. Other historic buildings along this promenade are the Town Hall, a splendid example of Gothic architecture, and further along are the Victoria Law Courts and St. Andrews Kirk. St. Andrew's is the oldest surviving structure of any church in Guyana.

The famous Stabroek Market, once described as a "bizarre bazaar", contains every conceivable item from house hold goods and gold jewellery to fresh meat and vegetables brought to town on the river daily. The clock tower can be seen for miles around and is a famous landmark.

No trip to Georgetown would be complete without a visit to the Botanical Gardens and zoo. The Botanical Gardens houses one of the most extensive collections of tropical flora in the Caribbean and are laid out with ponds, canals, kissing bridges and bandstand. It houses an especially interesting collection of palms including a unique branching palm. Over the years the zoo has become a wildlife rescue and rehabilitation centre and houses over one hundred different species of tropical wildlife.

We will also pay a visit to a pond either in the gardens or the National Park, to feed some Manatees. The West Indian Manatee is on the endangered list in many places, but Guyana has a very healthy and growing population.

The National Museum which contains a broad selection of our animal life portrayed in Taxidermy in beautiful old glass cases, should not be missed, nor the Walter Roth Museum of Anthropology, which explains Amerindian history and life style, and houses a wonderful collection of artifacts.

The tour will include walking along the Avenues with an experienced guide who will give you the history, rumour and facts on Georgetown and its citizens. The group will be accompanied at all times by a vehicle, which will be used for travel between areas of interest. During the tour there is always the opportunity to purchase that unusual gift or unique Guyanese handicrafts.

This evening pickup and transfer to Backyard Café for dinner. Backyard Café is located in the West Ruimveldt area where our host, guide and culinary master, Chef Delven Adams will greet you as you enter.

This as the name suggests, is a backyard that Chef Delven has turned into an exclusive little hidden gem of a restaurant. Try not to bang your head on the passion fruit hanging overhead from the arbor. If there are ripe ones you will be welcomed to try a freshly picked one. There are also all kinds of herbs growing around you. Anything you do not recognize, Delvin will be only too happy to tell you about it. His menu is whatever is on season at the time. It is a Guyanese fusion from all over the world.

Delven makes his purchase based on clients' suggestions and dietary requirements from the local market.

If you are interested, Chef Delven will welcome you to join him as he prepares a wonderful meal from the fruits, vegetables and meats he bought. He has a smoker and small fireside right outside and sometimes will prepare the fresh fruits right there and you can certainly help him and learn his secrets. His garlic fish is out of this world! Chef will invite you taste along as he prepares his unique dishes that are a fusing of Guyanese and first world cuisine. Or if you would prefer you can sit under the arbor and sip unique blends of juice or enjoy a cold Banks Beer, while taking in the sounds and smells of a delicious meal in the making in a secluded back yard in Georgetown. Chef works with you, he will ask what your interests are or what you would really like to try that you have not.

Once he is ready, we will start eating our way through the courses. We will start with an appetizer, to an entrée and end up with a dessert, which we may be hard presses to fit in, but we will give it our best shot and remember to pace yourself as you will want to try it all.

Meal Plan Breakfast and Lunch
Duration1 Night
Accommodation

Cara Lodge

More Info

  • starstarstar

    Cara Lodge


    Cara Lodge is the perfect hotel for those who want to soak up Guyanese heritage and culture. One of the oldest wooden buildings in Georgetown, it has in just a few years become the best known hotel in the country. Cara Lodge was built in ...

    Cara Lodge is the perfect hotel for those who want to soak up Guyanese heritage and culture. One of the oldest wooden buildings in Georgetown, it has in just a few years become the best known hotel in the country.

    Cara Lodge was built in the 1840s and originally consisted of two houses. It has a long and romantic history associated with it and was the home of the first Lord Mayor of Georgetown. Over the years it has hosted many dignitaries including Edward VII who stayed at the house in 1923 and planted the sapodilla tree in the front garden to mark the occasion. Other dignitaries have included President Jimmy Carter in 1996 and HRH Prince Charles in April 2000, HRH Prince Andrew in 2004 and Mick Jagger in 2005.

    All the rooms reflect the traditional building style of Guyana and all rooms have traditional Demerara Shutters and polished wooden floors.

    More Details

Day 9

Depart Georgetown

Transfer to the airport for your departing flight.

Meal Plan Breakfast

Other Information

DEPARTURES:

Daily

PRICE INCLUDES:

  • 8 nights' accommodation as indicated or similar
  • Meals as indicated
  • Airport transfers
  • Domestic flights
  • Excursions as described in itinerary
  • Local guides
  • Kaieteur National Park fee
  • Iwokrama Forest User fee
  • Iwokrama Canopy Walk fee
  • VAT

PRICE EXCLUDES:

  • Travel insurance
  • Visas if required
  • Gratuities
  • Items of a personal nature
  • Airport departure taxes
  • All international and domestic airfares and airfare taxes unless specified

TERMS AND CONDITIONS:

Prices are "from" per person based on twin/double share accommodation and for travel in low season. Seasonal surcharges and blackout dates may apply. Limited seat/spaces and all pricing is subject to change and availability. Rates for single or triple travellers are available on request - please enquire.

TB WILDERNGEO19SG: JOJ 2
16 Nov 2019
Trip Finder

What our travelers say

Goway Toolkit


Need help planning your holiday? Our toolkit is a great place to get started.