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Uzbekistan Vacations, Tours, Travel Packages & Experiences


  • Tashkent, the Capital of Uzbekistan
  • Tilya-kori Madrasah on Registan square in Samarkand, Uzbekistan
  • Bukhara, Uzbekistan
  • Street market in the city of Bukhara, Uzbekistan

Uzbekistan is located in Central Asia and is a landlocked country surrounded by Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and Afghanistan. It was incorporated into the Russian Empire during the 19th Century and in 1924, it became part of the Soviet Union until the country declared independence as the Republic of Uzbekistan in 1991. An interesting fact about the country is that it has the fourth-largest gold deposits in the world and also has significant untapped reserves of oil and gas. On Uzbekistan travel, the climate is among the most favorable in Central Asia and produces an abundance of fruit such as melons, grapes, apples, quinces, and pears.  

However, Uzbekistan tourism’s popularity as a destination involves its history and archaeological and cultural sites. During the 15th and 16th Centuries, it was an integral part of The Silk Route when caravans passed through the country bringing merchandise from Eastern Asia and from Europe.  The traders had a significant effect on Uzbekistan with an influx of cultural influences. Out of this, the major ancient cities of Bukhara, Samarkand and Khiva developed bringing a more exotic flavour to them that can be seen today through the architecture of mosques, minarets and mausoleums. It is said that the museums of Uzbekistan possess over two million artifacts depicting the unique historical and cultural life of the region. However, Uzbekistan’s history goes much further back. Tamerlane, who was born in Uzbekistan and whose armies killed an estimated 17 million people across Central Asia was responsible for beautifying the cities of Bukhara, Samarkand and Khiva. Alexander the Great also conquered and influenced Uzbekistan’s history and culture. 

The capital Tashkent has a mixture of modern new office buildings, hotels, parks and crumbling Soviet-style apartment blocks. It is a city with a certain amount of European influence. However, there are some interesting sites including a couple of mausoleums. Bukhara is Central Asia’s holiest city with a history going back a thousand years. The centre hasn’t changed very much over the last two Centuries. The highlights include its massive royal fortress and its many minarets. Samarkand has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site due to its many unique cultural monuments and architecture. Khiva, also a UNESCO World Heritage site with a distinct atmosphere, is a walled city and a living museum. Originally founded in the 6th Century, it has an inner city with a maze of narrow and winding streets offering well-preserved mosques, mausoleums, minarets as well as a magnificent fortress. 

Uzbek cuisine includes an Uzbek version of pilaf, the rice dish with spices, raisins, peas or quince added to give it extra flavour. Interestingly, bread is considered holy for the Uzbek people. Uzbek soups are rich with vegetables and seasonings and contain lots of carrots, turnips, onions and greens. Most popular is Uzbek Shurpa, a meat and vegetable soup. Then there are kebabs (known as shashlik) usually made with mutton. As for shopping, Uzbekistan tourism offers merchandise made by local artisan such as handmade ceramics, needlework, silk cloth and miniaturist paintings, all of which are not expensive to purchase on Uzbekistan travel.  

 

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